Are You A Confident Foreign Language Learner?

Are You A Confident Foreign Language Learner?

Confidence is key to being a gifted learner. Find out if you are brimming with the confidence that will help you achieve your language acquisition goals or if there is room for improvement. Although this quiz is geared towards my ESL students the quiz would also be helpful for learners of many different disciplines.

published on July 20, 201425 responses 3 4.8★ / 5

While attending a language class the teacher asks the students if anyone would like to describe what their favorite pet is. What is your most likely response?

While attending a language class the teacher asks the students if anyone would like to describe what their favorite pet is.  What is your most likely response?
You love pets, and would love to answer, but you are not quite sure how to properly describe your pet so you wait for someone else to answer.
You would like to tell them about your favorite pet, and do so if you feel like it, but you keep your answer brief and ask no follow up questions to the teacher like: what is your favorite pet?
You tell the teacher all about your favorite pet. You use words you are not quite sure fit, and ask the teacher to correct you. You take notes of his/her corrections. You might even ask the teacher or another classmate what their favorite pet is or what their least favorite pet is.
You tell the teacher what your favorite pet is, sometimes using words that you are not sure about, and asking for feedback. However, when the teacher gives you corrections you are not always good at remembering them or writing them down. It's hard to tell if she asked the same question the next day if you would have an improved answer or the exact same one with the exact same mistakes.

You see a woman on a corner in your hometown asking those who pass by for directions in the language you are studying. What would your response be?

You see a woman on a corner in your hometown asking those who pass by for directions in the language you are studying.  What would your response be?
You would definitely try to help; answering questions she asked the best you can, and telling her to repeat herself when you don't understand. You might even walk with her to where she is going to help her out, and also have a chance to practice your language skills.
You would feel nervous about speaking to her in her language, you might help her, but would only point at the map, you probably wouldn't speak to her.
You would be very interested in helping her, and speaking to her. However, if things got too confusing in the conversation you might lose interest quickly, and just point in the general direction you think she needs to go.
You would help her only if you weren't too busy, if the conversation seemed interesting and there weren't too many words you didn't understand. As soon as you lost interest you'd tell her to find someone else to help her.

Your little sister is working on her English homework, it's a subject you haven't reviewed in a long time and you're a little rusty. What would your response be.

Your little sister is working on her English homework, it's a subject you haven't reviewed in a long time and you're a little rusty.  What would your response be.
You've already done those classes, no need to figure them out again. Your little sister can figure it out on her own.
You'd like to help your little sister, but you only do so on the questions you know, you don't want her to know that you've forgotten some of this stuff.
You're thrilled at having a chance to review. Every question you're not 100% sure on you double check with other sources, and find different ways to practice.
You're happy to help your sister, and start reviewing some of these things you have already learned, but after a while whether the lesson is coming easy to you or not you'll probably get bored and tell your sister to finish the lesson on their own.

Your teacher seems to have made a grammar mistake on the whiteboard what do you do?

Your teacher seems to have made a grammar mistake on the whiteboard what do you do?
You quickly decide that it is probably you who have made the mistake, and even if it is hers it would be difficult to make her understand what you meant if you tried to point it out to her.
You are quick to point out the mistake, and are happy to talk to the teacher about it, but it is likely that you noticed the mistake in the first place, because you weren't really paying attention to what the teacher had been saying in the first place.
You have no problem asking about the mistake when the time is right, you might also have a question about a similiar problem you have.
You might point out the mistake, but are more likely just to listen to the rest of the lesson, you don't really feel a big need to figure out if it was actually a mistake or not.

You and your friend have promised to meet every week for coffee and speak only in English.

You and your friend have promised to meet every week for coffee and speak only in English.
You come often and speak in English often, mostly you relay on your friend to provide new material or new vocabulary, but you're generally good about speaking in English. If your friend really wants to speak in their your own language instead sometimes your okay with that too. Also sometimes if your schedule is too busy you'll cancel.
You sometimes or often find an excuse not to go to the meeting, but try to speak in English when you do. If your friend starts talking in your own language you are relieved.
You hardly ever miss a meeting. Sometimes people say you talk to much in the meeting or bring too many ideas, and sometimes your friend is very thankful for always pushing the meeting forward and keeping on track with your English practice.
You're pretty hit and miss with the meetings. When you come you do love to speak in English, but if you happen to get into a cool conversation in your language then that's fun too. Sometimes you bring interesting ideas or words or games to your conversation, sometimes you let others bring the ideas, and sometimes you might convince everyone to stop early and do something else a little bit more fun.

A friendly foreign language speaker moves into the apartment next to yours. How much of an effort will you make to get to know them?

A friendly foreign language speaker moves into the apartment next to yours.  How much of an effort will you make to get to know them?
You'll find any way to go over there and talk to him. If the person starts to get annoyed you might take a break, but as soon as you have the chance to invite them over for dinner or coffee you'll probably do it again.
It depends on how much you like them. If they don't seem to share your interests than you probably won't engage them. If they do seem interesting to you, you'll probably try to get to know them, but won't really pump them for help with your English.
You'll probably try to engage them quite a bit when you have the time. If the conversations you have with them are interesting then you'll keep them going, but if aren't so much you'll probably lose interests in the conversations and end them, but you'll still jump at the chance to talk to an English speaker every once in a while when you can.
You'll probably say simple greetings when you see them in the hall. If they invite you to dinner or something else you might say yes, but will probably bring a friend that speaks English better than you with you so they can help you out.

Your teacher asks you to create a five minute speaking presentation.

Your teacher asks you to create a five minute speaking presentation.
You will most likely find a presentation that you have already done for another class, and give that one.
You might draw some information from an old presentation or add some new material. It's likely that you will wait until the last minute to finish the project, and you might rely alot on just making up your presentation while you are giving it.

When you have the opportunity to speak in a foreign language what best describes your emotional state?

When you have the opportunity to speak in a foreign language what best describes your emotional state?
Ecstatic and Curious
Somewhat Interested and not anxious
Extremely Nervous
Interested, curious, not anxious, but hoping it's not going to go on forever

While you were taking this quiz if you did not understand a question what did you do?

While you were taking this quiz if you did not understand a question what did you do?
Looked up vocabulary online, asked a friend if they were around, re-read the question and all the answers and then finally answered as best you could
Didn't really worry about it or spend too much time re reading, but just picked the one that seemed to fit the best or that you understood the most
Got very ansious about trying to understanding the meanings of the question, tried to research, and answered the best you could
Read the questions over a bit, researched a little as well, but half way through the quiz just started skimming through the answers and answered as best you could