chemistry

simple

published on September 18, 2010161 responses 2 3.7★ / 5

Why is H+ sometimes written as H3O+ in equations?

h+h
If a free hydrogen ion encounters a water molecule, it attacks the unshared electron pairs on the oxygen in the water molecule and forms a hydronium ion, H3O+. The chemical bond that forms between the water and hydrogen ion is covalent and very strong. In an aqueous solution, essentially all of the H+ exists as H3O+.
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