Would you eat these Aussie foods?

Would you eat these Aussie foods?

Ah, Australia. The great land down under filled with unbearable heat, deadly animals, and some mildly interesting food. I know this is called a quiz, but it's basically a mass poll. (Heavily inspired by - okay, ripping off - @NobodyReally 's quizzes.) (i know a lot of these or similar may be eaten in other countries as well but oh well)

published on October 2615 responses 6 5.0★ / 5

Fairy bread.
Fairy bread is a slice of bread, spread with butter or margarine and then sprinkled with sprinkles. An essential nutrient for all young Australians.

Fairy bread.
Fairy bread is a slice of bread, spread with butter or margarine and then sprinkled with sprinkles. An essential nutrient for all young Australians.
Gimmie!
That's disgusting.
Okay?

Kangaroo meat.
Yep, kangaroos are edible, and pretty good actually. They taste kinda like beef but a lot leaner and actually pretty good for you. Kangaroo is available in most Aussie supermarkets.

Kangaroo meat.
Yep, kangaroos are edible, and pretty good actually. They taste kinda like beef but a lot leaner and actually pretty good for you. Kangaroo is available in most Aussie supermarkets.
Eww! Why would you eat a kangaroo?!
Sure, why not?
Maybe...?

Witjuti grubs.
Traditionally eaten by the Aborigines (native inhabitants of Australia), Witjuti (also spelt Witchetty) grubs are the larvae of Endoxyla leucomochla, a native moth. I've never eaten one myself but they're usually eaten either raw or lightly roasted over a fire and are said to taste like almonds. They are an important source of protein in the traditional Aboriginal diet.

Witjuti grubs.
Traditionally eaten by the Aborigines (native inhabitants of Australia), Witjuti (also spelt Witchetty) grubs are the larvae of Endoxyla leucomochla, a native moth. I've never eaten one myself but they're usually eaten either raw or lightly roasted over a fire and are said to taste like almonds. They are an important source of protein in the traditional Aboriginal diet.
Sounds good!
EWW!!!!
I'll give it a try...

Bush orange.
Bush orange is a fruit, native to Australia. In season from November to May, they are small green fruits that turn yellow when ripe. They are said to taste like mangoes.

Bush orange.
Bush orange is a fruit, native to Australia. In season from November to May, they are small green fruits that turn yellow when ripe. They are said to taste like mangoes.
That actually sounds pretty good.
Nope.
I'll try it...

Lamington
A lamington is a small square of sponge cake, filled with jam, dipped in chocolate and rolled in shredded coconut.

Lamington
A lamington is a small square of sponge cake, filled with jam, dipped in chocolate and rolled in shredded coconut.
That sounds delicious!
No thanks.
I'll give it a go.

ANZAC biscuits
Originating during wartimes, ANZAC biscuits were made during rationing, using whatever materials the people had on hand. They were sent to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, or ANZACs, (hence the name) as a gift from families at home to soldiers at war. They are made with rolled oats, flour, sugar, butter, golden syrup, baking soda, boiling water, and desiccated coconut.

ANZAC biscuits
Originating during wartimes, ANZAC biscuits were made during rationing, using whatever materials the people had on hand. They were sent to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, or ANZACs, (hence the name) as a gift from families at home to soldiers at war. They are made with rolled oats, flour, sugar, butter, golden syrup, baking soda, boiling water, and desiccated coconut.
Sounds great!
Not for me.
Sure?

Vegemite
Ah, Vegemite, the classic spread Australians like to tease foreigners with. Made from concentrated yeast extract, the Vegemite has a strong flavour that is hard to describe. It is usually eaten on toast, or in a sandwich with cheese. Remember to spread it THINLY. (i'm looking at you, America.)

Vegemite
Ah, Vegemite, the classic spread Australians like to tease foreigners with. Made from concentrated yeast extract, the Vegemite has a strong flavour that is hard to describe. It is usually eaten on toast, or in a sandwich with cheese. Remember to spread it THINLY. (i'm looking at you, America.)
I love vegemite!
Vegemite is disgusting, how can you Australians even eat it?!
I'd like to try it, at least.

Damper
Damper is home-made bread, traditionally made by swagmen and campers out on the outback, baked in the coals of a campfire. It is very simple, made with only flour and water.

Damper
Damper is home-made bread, traditionally made by swagmen and campers out on the outback, baked in the coals of a campfire. It is very simple, made with only flour and water.
Sounds good!
Gross.
Fair go.