Would you eat these Russian foods?

Would you eat these Russian foods?

Would you? Russia has many different types of foods to choose from. Which ones would you eat?

published on October 293 responses 0

“Borscht is a sour soup commonly consumed in Eastern Europe and across Russia. The variety most often associated with the name in English is of Ukrainian origin, and includes beetroots as one of the main ingredients, which gives the dish its distinctive red color. It shares the name, however, with a wide selection of sour-tasting soups without beetroots, such as sorrel-based green borscht, rye-based white borscht and cabbage borscht.”
Wikipedia.


Would you eat borscht?

“Borscht is a sour soup commonly consumed in Eastern Europe and across Russia. The variety most often associated with the name in English is of Ukrainian origin, and includes beetroots as one of the main ingredients, which gives the dish its distinctive red color. It shares the name, however, with a wide selection of sour-tasting soups without beetroots, such as sorrel-based green borscht, rye-based white borscht and cabbage borscht.”
Wikipedia.


Would you eat borscht?
Sure!
Hmm...
Uh, no thank you.
Maybe.

Pirozhki?


“A common variety of pirozhki are baked stuffed buns made from yeast dough and often glazed with egg to produce the common golden colour. They commonly contain meat (typically beef) or a vegetable filling (mashed potatoes, mushrooms, onions and egg, or cabbage). Pirozhki could also be stuffed with fish (e.g., salmon) or with an oatmeal filling mixed with meat or giblets. Sweet-based fillings could include stewed or fresh fruit (apples, cherries, apricots, chopped lemon, etc.), jam, quark or cottage cheese.”
Wikipedia.

Pirozhki?


“A common variety of pirozhki are baked stuffed buns made from yeast dough and often glazed with egg to produce the common golden colour. They commonly contain meat (typically beef) or a vegetable filling (mashed potatoes, mushrooms, onions and egg, or cabbage). Pirozhki could also be stuffed with fish (e.g., salmon) or with an oatmeal filling mixed with meat or giblets. Sweet-based fillings could include stewed or fresh fruit (apples, cherries, apricots, chopped lemon, etc.), jam, quark or cottage cheese.”
Wikipedia.
Nope.
Yes.
Maybe, maybe not.
Sure would! It looks delicious.
I dunno.
Probably not.

Shashlyk?

“Shashlik or shashlyk is a dish of skewered and grilled cubes of meat, similar to or synonymous with shish kebab. It is known by this name traditionally in the Caucasus and Central Asia, and from the 19th century became popular across much of the Russian Empire.”
Wikipedia.

Shashlyk?

“Shashlik or shashlyk is a dish of skewered and grilled cubes of meat, similar to or synonymous with shish kebab. It is known by this name traditionally in the Caucasus and Central Asia, and from the 19th century became popular across much of the Russian Empire.”
Wikipedia.
Eh, not a fan of kebabs.
Uh...maybe?
Yes, it looks delicious!!
I'm unsure..

Beef Stroganoff?

“Beef stroganoff consists of strips of beef in a creamy sauce with mushrooms or tomatoes, often served with rice, noodles, or potatoes. This recipe has a long history, and many variations for its preparation exist.”

Beef Stroganoff?

“Beef stroganoff consists of strips of beef in a creamy sauce with mushrooms or tomatoes, often served with rice, noodles, or potatoes. This recipe has a long history, and many variations for its preparation exist.”
Eww no.
Maybe some...
Of course I would eat that! It
looks and probably tastes
amazing!
Nope.
Hmmmm.....

Kvass?

“Kvass is a refreshing fermented beverage with slight carbonation. Although it has a very slight alcohol content, it is not considered an alcoholic beverage. It is made from black or regular rye bread or doug.”

Kvass?

“Kvass is a refreshing fermented beverage with slight carbonation. Although it has a very slight alcohol content, it is not considered an alcoholic beverage. It is made from black or regular rye bread or doug.”
Yes!
No, probably not
I...maybe??!!
Sure..

Morozhenoe?

Morozhenoe is a Russian ice cream.

Morozhenoe?

Morozhenoe is a Russian ice cream.
Too sweet.
I don't like ice cream. 0_0
How many calories?
Yesss! Delicious!!!
I have no reason not to.

“Shchi is a Russian style cabbage soup. When sauerkraut is used instead, the soup is called sour shchi, while soups based on sorrel, spinach, nettle, and similar plants are called green shchi. In the past, the term sour shchi was also used to refer to a drink, a variation of kvass, which was unrelated to the soup.”
Wikipedia.


Would you eat this?

“Shchi is a Russian style cabbage soup. When sauerkraut is used instead, the soup is called sour shchi, while soups based on sorrel, spinach, nettle, and similar plants are called green shchi. In the past, the term sour shchi was also used to refer to a drink, a variation of kvass, which was unrelated to the soup.”
Wikipedia.


Would you eat this?
Yuck!
Yum!
Maybe.
Not likely.
Yes, please.
I don't know.

“Kholodetsa is a dish of thickened to a jelly-like mass from cooling meat broth with pieces of meat.”
Wikipedia.

“Kholodetsa is a dish of thickened to a jelly-like mass from cooling meat broth with pieces of meat.”
Wikipedia.
Looks good.
Is there anything else on the menu?
Maybe a very small bite?
Sure, it is heathy after all. :)
I guess.

“Pashka is a festive dish made in Eastern Orthodox countries which consists of food that is forbidden during the fast of Great Lent. It is made during Holy Week and then brought to Church on Great Saturday to be blessed after the Paschal Vigil.”
Wikipedia.

Would you eat this?

“Pashka is a festive dish made in Eastern Orthodox countries which consists of food that is forbidden during the fast of Great Lent. It is made during Holy Week and then brought to Church on Great Saturday to be blessed after the Paschal Vigil.”
Wikipedia.

Would you eat this?
Awww, it's cute!
Yes!
Maybe not.

Thank-you for taking. ❤️❤️❤️❤️

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