Is Your Antagonist/Villain a Mary-Sue/Gary-Stu?

Is Your Antagonist/Villain a Mary-Sue/Gary-Stu?

I see a lot of quizzes targeting at OCs in general, but there are huge differences between different characters that play different roles in their stories. This quiz will only be focusing on antagonists and villains. Disclaimer: I am aware that antagonists and villains are different. However, their roles are similar in the sense that they both cause conflict in the story.

published on October 1524 responses 5 5.0★ / 5

What kind of name does your character have?

A common name like John Smith or Sally Jones. Their name tends to blend in rather than stand out.
An unusual first name and an ordinary surname/vice versa. Ex; Lucinda O'Brian or Ben Skysong.
Middle ground between unusual and common for both the first and last name. Ex; Holly Revnic or
Driss Phillippe.
A name that would be very unusual in a modern setting, but makes sense in the story setting. Ex;
Katniss Everdeen or Ciel Phantomhive.
An unusual name for the setting. Ex; a modern American character with a name like Edmund
Canterbury.
A VERY unusual name for the setting. Ex; a modern English character with an anime-esque name like
Miku Nakashima.

What kind of powers does your character have?

My character does not have any powers in a world where magic/superhuman abilities exist.
My character does not have any powers in a world where magic/superhuman abilities DON'T exist.
My character has normal powers that would not be seen as exceptionally rare or special in the
universe.
My character's powers are considered to be more powerful than normal in the universe to a reasonable
extent. They are definitely more powerful than the protagonist. (ORIGINAL FICTION)
My character is a fan-fiction character that has the same powers or similar powers as the cannon
characters.
My character is a fan-fiction character that has STRONGER powers than the cannon characters.
My character is NOT a fan-fiction character, but they have unusually strong powers that should not
ordinarily exist in the universe.

What is you character's motive?

They have a long history with the protagonist/hero.
They have a motive outside of the protagonist/hero altogether (like world-domination) and the
protagonist/hero just happens to stand in the way.
I will admit that my character has a cliche motive, but I made sure to put an original twist on it to
make it memorable.
Revenge, envy, or power.
They have no particular motive. They are just insane.

Does your character have a mental illness/disorder that excuses their actions from your point of view?

No. They do have a mental illness, but it is not one of the 'edgy' ones (e.g. autism) and it has nothing
it doesn't excuse their actions.
They have a mental illness that shapes parts of their identity (e.g. dissociative identity disorder). But it
does not excuse their actions.
They have a mental illness that significantly shapes their identity (e.g. psychopathy). But it does not
excuse their actions.
No, they do not have a mental illness of any kind.
Yes. They are are treated as a victim by me, the author.

Does your character have an awful backstory that excuses their actions?

No. They never had any real struggles that go outside of the norm.
No. They had a perfect/near-perfect life.
They have a 'tragic' backstory, but it does not excuse their actions. Instead, they have to face
legitimate struggles and consequences because of their trauma.
They have a 'tragic' backstory, but it does not excuse their actions. However, the backstory mostly just
exists so they have something to angst about and it doesn't cause any real problems for them.
They have a very tragic backstory that earns them pity points from me, the author.
They have an EXTREMELY tragic backstory that is extremely unlikely. I use this as an excuse
frequently.

Do you use poetic language to describe your character?

No. I use LESS graceful language to describe them than the protagonist/hero.
No. I don't use language that is even remotely poetic to describe any of my characters.
Somewhat. I use descriptive words that I would not use in an actual conversation, but I take caution to
make sure I don't go over the top.
I use poetic language to describe all my characters equally.
Absolutely. I use more than one paragraphs to describe simple attributes poetically.

Is your character considered attractive?

Not in the slightest.
They are not supposed to be attractive, they are supposed to look frightening.
They are average-looking or relatively attractive. But nothing outside of natures laws.
They extremely beautiful.
They are so beautiful that they do not even look human.

Does your character seduce any of the other characters?

No. They are not considered attractive.
No. They have no particular interest in any of the other characters or vice versa.
Yes.
More than once.

How does your character treat murder?

They see it as it is; a crime. They would never commit murder.
They WOULD commit murder, but they would not take it very lightly.
They commit cold, calculated murders that each serve a purpose.
They find enjoyment in their murders.
They kill for fun alone, even if it causes them problems down the road.

Do they have any physical features that would not fit their setting?

No. They look totally ordinary.
No particularly. They don't look like your average Joe, but they still look normal.
Yes. They have a few strange features like scars or tattoos.
Yes. They have multiple strange features like birthmarks or intense gazes.
Absolutely. They have extremely strange features like horns or wings.

Do their actions have little to no consequences on a frequent basis?

Yes. In fact, the consequences for their actions are more severe that usual.
Yes. They receive adequate consequences for their actions.
Yes and no. They take measures to avoid consequences. For example, they would put a lot of care and
effort into covering up a crime instead of leaving it out in the open.
No. They are often 'let off the hook' because others are afraid or charmed by them.
No. They rarely even face consequences for no real reasons other than convenience for me, the
author.

Do they use a bladed weapon in a modern setting for no logical reason?

No.
Yes.

Does your character have a life outside of antagonist/villain activities.

Yes. They have hobbies, interests, and personalities just like the other characters in the story.
Yes and no. They have a fixation over their role in the story, however, it does not completely consume
them.
Not really. I never really thought about this before.
No. They are evil through-and-through.

Does your character have a story arc of their own?

Yes, but it is not too flashy or important.
Yes. They are a dynamic character with many dimensions.
Somewhat. They are an evil villain, and their role in the story does not demand a story arc of their
own.
No. They stay the same from the start of the story to the end of the story simply because I say so.

Have you ever added something to their character just to make them 'cooler' or 'edgier' at all?

No. They are not 'cool' or 'edgy' in any sense.
No. They have some traits that could be interpreted this way, but they have reasons behind them and
serve purpose.
Yes. I didn't go overboard, but I certainly did add some 'edgy' features without any real reason.
Yes. And I have taken some of these traits quite far.

Did you feel like I attacked or insulted your character in any way?

No.
Yes.